How People Lived Then | History - Life In The 40s | Club Dahlia

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How People Lived Then
April 11, 2011
6:33 pm
RocketMan
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Resources were scare during the war and we all scraped by as best we could. Food was rationed during the war as well as metal and rubber. You ran the tires into the ground and patched and patched until they were more patches than rubber. But we also had fun then. I remember going to a friends house to listen to the radio which was run by a car battery. We listened to a lot of thing but the one I remember listening to the most was the Grand Old Opry on Saturday nights. Anyone else? Or am I the only senior here? :)

April 13, 2011
11:06 am
enJoyingLife
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April 3, 2011
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My mom always talked about growing a garden in the summer and canning the vegetables to put them up for winter.  They would save the seeds so they wouldn't have to buy them every year.  She also talked about going swimming with friends at the "swimming hole" in the creek.  They tied a rope securely on the limb of a tree and would hold on to the rope and swing out over the water and let go.  Though life was hard back then, they found ways to cope and have fun.

April 16, 2011
2:56 am
NatureElf
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April 11, 2011
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My dad was born in the early 40s, in Europe. So he has many memories of the war. Sad times and tough times mostly, but some good stories here and there. I love hearing and  reading about life during those times, it is so fascinating.

April 16, 2011
8:54 am
FlorrieMay
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April 12, 2011
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I remember listening to the radio as a child because, of course we didn't have a TV until I was a teenager. I used to listen to Lost in Space although this may have been early 50s.

April 18, 2011
8:22 pm
luv2write
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RocketMan said:

Resources were scare during the war and we all scraped by as best we could. Food was rationed during the war as well as metal and rubber. You ran the tires into the ground and patched and patched until they were more patches than rubber. But we also had fun then. I remember going to a friends house to listen to the radio which was run by a car battery. We listened to a lot of thing but the one I remember listening to the most was the Grand Old Opry on Saturday nights. Anyone else? Or am I the only senior here? :)


 

My mother used to tell us how she would listen to the radio a lot.  It was a great pastime for her and something that the whole family could enjoy.  I am sure she listened to the Grand Ole Opry as well.

April 22, 2011
5:49 pm
RocketMan
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April 3, 2011
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There were other shows we listened to as well. Lum and Abner, The Shadow and a lot more. I would love to have a CD of those old shows to listen to. Sort of relive my youth, so to speak.

April 22, 2011
6:41 pm
justontime
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As well as the rationing there was a deep fear, of the bombing and what the future would hold. My older family members. speak of watching the bombe fall on Coventry (they lived about 20 mils away) They were afraid of what would happen

April 23, 2011
8:58 am
FlorrieMay
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My husband is a little older than me and was born in London. He talks about the bombs falling and how a lot of his friends were evacuated to places in the country. It must have been a sad time for the children who had to leave their parents.

April 23, 2011
10:27 am
justontime
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My mum was 9 when the war started. A lot of children were evacuated to her area. They shared her school too. Some of them stayed after the war because they were happy and settled here.

April 29, 2011
10:42 am
katharina
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You need to check a place like Amazon, RocketMan… they do have recordings of many of those old radio shows!  The set I have is on cassette tapes (who knew they'd become obsolete?!)  and I've always enjoyed listening to them.  Many even come complete with the old commercials.  :-)   (I just chose Amazon out of the hat… not sure if they carry the CDs, but they're definitely available and a google search on it may be interesting.)

April 29, 2011
8:05 pm
luv2write
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Amazon is a great place to look. But so is ebay.  One can often get some great deals on ebay for little or nothing if you look hard enough.

May 6, 2011
8:17 pm
Zootsuit
Southeast
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It was an amazing time to have lived in.  The newspaper was an important source of information during the war. Wish I still had the photo, but my Uncle was sitting at the kitchen table reading the paper, and the Headline read" YANKS PLUNGE INLAND".  My Grandfather planted a victory garden, and spoke about the air raid drills, and black out curtains.  Wasn't it during this timeframe that Orson Welles scared the nation into thinking we had been attacked from outer space?  It caused a great amount of panic.

May 7, 2011
6:40 am
FlorrieMay
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Zootsuit said:

Wasn't it during this timeframe that Orson Welles scared the nation into thinking we had been attacked from outer space?  It caused a great amount of panic.


This happened in 1938, the day before Halloween, when his radio adaptation of "The War of the Worlds" was broadcast. It was a few years before I was born but, growing up, I heard it repeated because it had caused such panic. People believed what they heard on the radio then as some people believe all they see on TV nowadays!
May 8, 2011
9:34 pm
JazzyDame
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May 8, 2011
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My father was born in ’31 and remembers hearing FDR’s “Infamy Speech” whilst listening to his radio as he did his chores.  He was in the barn milking a cow when those memorable words cut through the cold December air…he says he nearly knocked over the milk bucket and made a bee-line for the house where he found his mother and siblings huddled around the radio in silence.  At the tender age of ten, he felt the patriotic call to serve his country and enlisted as soon as he reached eligibility. 

 

My mother was born in ’41 and, although she was very, very young, she remembers the blackout curtains and rations during wartime.  She also remembers Victory Gardens, and today we (my parents and I) still maintain a “Victory Garden”.  It’s something of a tribute to the Greatest Generation, as well as a wonderful effort toward homesteading, or self-sustenance.  Plus, homegrown vegetables and fruits just taste better!  Every Friday evening after dinner, we put on some Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey or any other of our favorite big band leaders, gather around the kitchen table and complete a crossword puzzle together, shuffle the deck and play a game or two, pour some coffee and talk about current events and issues…the conversation easily waxes sentimental, and eventually returns to ‘the good ol’ days’.  We need to remember the past to gain our bearings in the present. 

May 11, 2011
1:14 am
empirestate
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Life during the war was good for me, but also, I feel as though I was exploited due to my young age. We lived in Norway, and we came under German occupation. My father joined the German forces, and we were expected to obey the Fuhrer and the Nazi Party to the fullest extent, though technically, my father was not a party member since he was in the armed forces. I still remember having to heil hitler in my elementary classes, and it was expected of us to do the same whenever we saw a German police officer. The rare times I was with my father, however, I rarely had to do as such because of his rank. People saluted him like he was the messiah, but I am still wary to this day as to what exactly he did during the war. There are very little records of his actions other than his uniforms and his officer's sword and pistol.

August 24, 2011
11:59 am
Brandon Meyer
La Crosse, WI
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August 24, 2011
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RocketMan said:

There were other shows we listened to as well. Lum and Abner, The Shadow and a lot more. I would love to have a CD of those old shows to listen to. Sort of relive my youth, so to speak.

Well, I did some searching and here's a site where you can download episodes of old radio shows:

http://bit.ly/2jzWki

I hope this helps bring back some good ole memories!

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